Cost to run a hot tub

How Much Does It Cost To Run A Hot Tub?


Some people are afraid to buy a hot tub because of the perceived costs that come along with hot tub ownership.

As it turns out, having your own hot tub at home is actually very affordable!

The average modern spa costs about $1 per day to operate.

Some newer energy-efficient hot tubs even cost as low as $10 to $20 per month to operate. The exact cost of running a hot tub depends however on a variety of factors.

types of hot tubs
more expensive ones cost less per month in the long run

In this article we’ll show you the the true cost of running a hot tub, the recurring and the one-off costs that come with hot tub ownership.

Recurring costs

Water

How much does it cost to fill a hot tub? Water usage is not a major cost in running a hot tub, going as low as $1 per month!

(Re)filling your hot tub

Most spa owners drain, clean and refill their hot tub 3 to 5 times per year. As the water in a hot tub is sanitized, you luckily don’t have to change the water after each use.

Your hot tub water refill rate depends on how frequently the spa is used and whether a 24/7 filter cleaning system is used.

Calculating the water cost

A practical guesstimate of the annual cost to fill your hot tub would be

Times used X Gallon capacity of tub X (Local water+sewer rate per gallon)

Example of actual water cost of a hot tub

Refills per year : 4 times
Capacity of hot tub : 220 gallon
Water rate per gallon : $0,00453
Sewer rate per gallon : $0,00909

4 X 220 X ($0,00453 + $0,00909) = $12/year

As you can see in this example this particular hot tub sets you back only around $12 per year or just 1$ per month in water consumption cost.

So don’t worry, under normal usage and circumstances the water cost of running a hot tub is minimal.

Electricity

Many people ask themselves “How much electricity does a hot tub use per month or during the winter?

The two major energy consumers in a hot tub are the heater and the pump. A hot tub heater brings the water to the desired temperature (and keeps it at this temperature), while a hot tub pump powers the jets and water circulation.

Your electricity cost depends on your local unit price per kilowatt hour, the temperature you set your hot tub to and how many times you use it.

The typical cost in electricity to run a hot tub is less than $1 per day. Many recent hot tubs are way more energy-efficient costing on average around $25 per month in electricity. Older spa models can cost over $50 per month.

Insurance

Owning a hot tub increases the cost of your liability insurance, this usually amounts to an annual increase under $20.

Maintenance

Potential hot tub buyers often wonder how expensive it is to maintain a hot tub. These are the recurring maintenance costs:

Filter replacement

Hot tub filters need to be replaced every 1 to 2 years. These filters usually cost around $20 to $60 each.

Hot tub sanitation

While the water in your hot tub doesn’t need to be replaced often, it’s absolutely necessary to keep it in a sanitary condition. Once in a while you need to add chemicals such as bromine or chlorine to your hot tub water to sanitize and balance it. This costs around $10 to $20 per month, depending on how often the tub is actually used.

One-off costs

Foundation

A permanent hot tub needs to be installed on top of a concrete slab or a sturdy deck. A deck costs around $15 to $35 per square foot, while a poured concrete slab costs around $5 to $20 per square foot.

Alternatively you could use a prefabricated spa pad, which on average costs around $400.

Insulation

A well-insulated cover preserves heat, which results in a decreased electricity bill. Most hot tub covers cost around $50 to $400.

In the higher price range category a custom cover will usually be included along with your hot tub.

Electrical installation

It is absolutely recommended that you hire a licenced electrician to properly install the electrical wiring on your hot tub.

Electrical connections for a hot tub will typically cost around $300 to $1000, this depends on your current electrical setup.


posted by Steven L.    May 8, 2019    June 14, 2020